December 13, 2011
Water drop photography
Taken with a Nikon D90, 50mm f/1.8 lens, and a Nikon SB-600 Speedlight. 
The SB-600 was used remotely via the commander mode of the built-in flash on the camera body. Imagine a square box that was used as the container for my water. In the bottom right corner was my camera and in the bottom left was my SB-600.  
I took about 30 shots and got about 6 satisfactory ones. I then took these shots into Lightroom and edited them to have different hues and sharpened up the entire image. Here is the final product. Simple set-up, but great results! Try it yourself.

Water drop photography

Taken with a Nikon D90, 50mm f/1.8 lens, and a Nikon SB-600 Speedlight

The SB-600 was used remotely via the commander mode of the built-in flash on the camera body. Imagine a square box that was used as the container for my water. In the bottom right corner was my camera and in the bottom left was my SB-600.  

I took about 30 shots and got about 6 satisfactory ones. I then took these shots into Lightroom and edited them to have different hues and sharpened up the entire image. Here is the final product. Simple set-up, but great results! Try it yourself.

December 8, 2011
Requests

Hi guys,

From now on, if you would like a photograph discussed in-depth, please like my Facebook page, choose the photograph you would like me to talk about, and send me the photograph in a tumblr message (e.g. Album: Self-portraits, Picture: Thumbnail #2). 

Facebook page URL: http://www.facebook.com/TrinhPhotography

November 29, 2011
Hi guys. Here’s a self-portrait I took with my favorite film camera: the Canon AE-1 with a 70-210mm f/4 lens. 
I turned this photograph into a black and white because I wanted to take away the distracting qualities of the photo, which in this case, was the color. By taking away the distractions, the viewer is focused on the composition and the objects in the picture itself. Using Lightroom, I dodged and burned the photograph to turn a dull black and white into a directional photograph. By this, I mean the viewer’s eye is taken to where I want them to go: the camera lens. Dodging (lightening) the lens, I was able to bring out the reflection of the landscape it was facing and this adds another interesting facet to the overall photo quality.
Exposure settings: 1/250 sec, f/4, ISO 400.
By using a tripod and a ML-L3 wireless remote shutter release, I was able to produce a quality shot by myself, of myself, without the need of any assistance. It is recommended to set your camera to use the remote with at least a five second timer so that you have time to hide the remote and focus on your own posing. 
Tip of the day: Self-portraits are a powerful way to practice your portraiture and find out what looks good to you and what can be worked on. Spend some time each day looking through your self-portraits and ask yourself what can be done to improve. 
Reblog and promote me for more in-depth photo discussions and tips!
Follow me on Facebook!

Hi guys. Here’s a self-portrait I took with my favorite film camera: the Canon AE-1 with a 70-210mm f/4 lens

I turned this photograph into a black and white because I wanted to take away the distracting qualities of the photo, which in this case, was the color. By taking away the distractions, the viewer is focused on the composition and the objects in the picture itself. Using Lightroom, I dodged and burned the photograph to turn a dull black and white into a directional photograph. By this, I mean the viewer’s eye is taken to where I want them to go: the camera lens. Dodging (lightening) the lens, I was able to bring out the reflection of the landscape it was facing and this adds another interesting facet to the overall photo quality.

Exposure settings: 1/250 sec, f/4, ISO 400.

By using a tripod and a ML-L3 wireless remote shutter release, I was able to produce a quality shot by myself, of myself, without the need of any assistance. It is recommended to set your camera to use the remote with at least a five second timer so that you have time to hide the remote and focus on your own posing. 

Tip of the day: Self-portraits are a powerful way to practice your portraiture and find out what looks good to you and what can be worked on. Spend some time each day looking through your self-portraits and ask yourself what can be done to improve. 

Reblog and promote me for more in-depth photo discussions and tips!

Follow me on Facebook!

November 28, 2011
This is one of my favorite Arizona sunrise photographs that I took in the early morning right when the sun came out. To get a shot like this, you are giving yourself the best chance if you are set up before the sun comes out. I was out at 5:30 AM and waited for the first streak of light to bounce off the clouds at around 6:00 AM. 
Exposure settings: 1/3 sec, f/8, ISO 100.
In order to get the colors in this photograph like I did, it is necessary to understand the white balance function in your camera. I used the incandescent setting which gave me the mixture of purple, red, and blue to tint the sky. In reality, the sky was fully blue and streaked with a little pink from the first rays of the sun. With the incandescent setting, I was able to transform this otherwise boring photograph into a sky shot with feeling and vibrancy. Also, I increased my exposure compensation to +0.7 so that the sky would brighten up and not be so moody because, after all, this is an early morning shot and I was aiming for a not too dark, not too bright exposure, but something very easy on the eyes. I probably took 5-6 shots before I got what I liked by fiddling with my settings. 
Tip of the day: If you have the time to be technical with your camera, imagine the shot and make it happen. Don’t settle for anything less than what you are envisioning. 
I composed the cactus on the left to provide a feeling of the land to balance out the majesty and grandeur of the sky. It also gives a distinct symbol that this was taken in the desert.
Reblog and promote me for more in-depth photo discussions and tips!
Follow me on Facebook!

This is one of my favorite Arizona sunrise photographs that I took in the early morning right when the sun came out. To get a shot like this, you are giving yourself the best chance if you are set up before the sun comes out. I was out at 5:30 AM and waited for the first streak of light to bounce off the clouds at around 6:00 AM. 

Exposure settings: 1/3 sec, f/8, ISO 100.

In order to get the colors in this photograph like I did, it is necessary to understand the white balance function in your camera. I used the incandescent setting which gave me the mixture of purple, red, and blue to tint the sky. In reality, the sky was fully blue and streaked with a little pink from the first rays of the sun. With the incandescent setting, I was able to transform this otherwise boring photograph into a sky shot with feeling and vibrancy. Also, I increased my exposure compensation to +0.7 so that the sky would brighten up and not be so moody because, after all, this is an early morning shot and I was aiming for a not too dark, not too bright exposure, but something very easy on the eyes. I probably took 5-6 shots before I got what I liked by fiddling with my settings. 

Tip of the day: If you have the time to be technical with your camera, imagine the shot and make it happen. Don’t settle for anything less than what you are envisioning. 

I composed the cactus on the left to provide a feeling of the land to balance out the majesty and grandeur of the sky. It also gives a distinct symbol that this was taken in the desert.

Reblog and promote me for more in-depth photo discussions and tips!

Follow me on Facebook!

November 28, 2011

veaglesfly-deactivated20120121 said: Man your photography are out of this world!!! Makes me wanna learn photography

Thank you, my friend! Yes, if you are interested, I would definitely suggest learning the basics and working from there! I personally learned from just reading articles and taking pictures! You got this bud! Thanks again for the compliment. It means a lot to me.

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